Category Archives: Connecting Students to Careers, Professionals to Communities, & Communities to Better Health

FREE NAO HPV Webinar

“Evidence-Based Communication Strategies for Improving Child and Adolescent Vaccine Uptake”

Wednesday, September 19th, 2-3 p.m. ET

How much of a problem is vaccine hesitancy? It’s complicated and there is no easy solution. Find out how Motivational Interviewing can improve child and adolescent vaccine uptake. This webinar will focus on understanding what it means to make a “strong” vaccine recommendation, understanding how to make a “presumptive” recommendation for the vaccine and use Motivational Interviewing techniques if needed, and learn a few specific evidence-based vaccine communication tips.

Target Audience

This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of health professionals who provide and/or promote immunizations including  physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, as well as health professions students.

Register Now

New Executive Director

Northeast Missouri Area Health Education Center (NEMO AHEC) announces the addition of Robin Worthington, MHS, as the new Executive Director. Worthington will provide leadership, management, and direction to NEMO AHEC as well as collaborate and partner with area agencies and volunteers. Worthington will work with NEMO AHEC staff to provide quality programming and service to the current and future health care workforce.

Worthington graduated from Walden University with her M.S. in Human and Social Services in 2018. Previously she obtained a B.A. in Human Services as well as an A.S. in Human Services.

NEMO AHEC is a non-profit agency headquartered in Kirksville, Missouri, which serves 21 counties. NEMO AHEC aims to enhance access to quality health care, particularly primary and preventative care by growing and supporting northeast Missouri’s health care workforce(nemoahec.org). NEMO AHEC is part of the Missouri AHEC network which maintains a presence in all 114 counties and the City of St. Louis.

 

National Immunization Awareness Month

Protect Your Preteens Today from HPV Cancers Tomorrow

National Immunization Awareness Month is a reminder

 we all need vaccines throughout our lives.

 

HPV vaccination is recommended for preteen girls and boys at age 11 to 12.

If your son or daughter hasn’t started or finished the HPV vaccine series yet, it’s not too late! Now is a good time to ask their doctor or nurse about vaccines for your preteens and teens.

HPV is short for human papillomavirus. In the U.S. each year, there are 32,500 women and men affected by HPV cancers. In both women and men, HPV can cause anal cancer and mouth/throat (oropharyngeal) cancer. It can also cause cancers of the cervix, vulva and vagina in women, and cancer of the penis in men. Most of the HPV infections that cause these cancers could be prevented with vaccination.

HPV vaccination has a reassuring safety record backed by more than 10 years of monitoring and research. More than 100 million doses have been distributed in the U.S. since the vaccine was introduced, and no serious safety concerns have been linked to HPV vaccination. Possible side effects after HPV vaccination are generally mild and go away quickly, such as pain, redness or swelling in the arm where the shot was given.

Jacquelyn, a real-life mother of two and cervical cancer survivor, shares her story:

When I got a Pap test after my son was born, I found out I had cancer and needed a total hysterectomy.

My husband and I have been together for 15 years and we were planning to have more children. We are so grateful for our two wonderful children, but we were hoping for more – which is not going to happen now.

Although they caught the cancer early, I still have medical issues, taking time away from my family, my friends and my job.

Worse, every time the doctor calls, I hold my breath until I get the results. Cancer is always in the back of my mind.

I will protect my son and daughter by getting them both the HPV vaccine as soon as they turn 11. I tell everyone to get the HPV vaccine series to protect themselves from cancer.

For more information about vaccines recommended for preteens, visit:

https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases/index.html